Friday, July 10, 2009

Sometimes the LAMP Stack is Appropriate for Enterprise Use: Externally-Facing Blogs

I've been doing a lot of research into how open-source software can and can't be used in Enterprises. In January, I wrote a post called "Is the LAMP Stack Appropriate for Enterprise Use?" That looked into conditions that using it may be a good idea.

I was inspired this morning when reading a blog post about 21 popular brands that use wordpress. Wordpress is an open-source content management platform based on PHP, and I was blown away to learn that eBay, Yahoo, Ford, and the Wall Street Journal all use wordpress in the architectures of their externally-facing blogs

Who would have thought?

3 comments:

  1. > Who would have thought?

    Apparently someone who does research.

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  2. News Ltd (AUS) uses the LAMP stack for all it's externally facing blogs also but 'tis not wordpress. (http://blogs.news.com.au/ http://www.thepunch.com.au/)

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  3. woops - meant (http://www.news.com.au/blogs/)

    My arm of the business is investing some serious time and energy into building a solid lamp platform for rapid development and social websites.

    ZendFramework is an enterprise ready library if I've ever seen one and with apps out there like APC (tends to halve server load with a vanilla install), memcache (which php only requires a flag to set session handling for), IDS (http://php-ids.org/) I can't see why lamp isn't capable of being an enterprise stack...

    FirePHP allows for rapid development and debugging. If you set-up a decent profiler in your app you can catch most bloat before it ever gets to production.

    With Phing, PHPUnit, Xinc etc.. there's nothing stopping you having an enterprise level release management process...

    If you're fortunate enough for MySQL to become a bottleneck, using a complete framework (with proper DAL) like Zend's allows you just switch out the mysql db for oracle or something more 'enterprise ready' so no fuss...

    Personally I don't see any issue with the stack being 'enterprise ready' it all comes down to how well the system is architected and the quality of devs working on the project (that being said surely these are issues regardless of which stack's your poison).

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